Angry Rant – Plastic Horror Stories

The problems of plastic pollution start with us and I see plastic misuse everyday at work.

Working in retail, I’ve seen some pretty discouraging things when it comes to the use of plastic.

We can’t escape it anymore. It’s on everything, it’s in everything, it’s the packaging for everything.

We are choking on plastic.

Right now, it’s horrible working at a drug store. People by a stick of lipstick and they think they need a bag. You’re carrying a huge purse, lady, just put it in there. I saw a lady buy a CD, I asked if she needed a bag. She said yes, I put the CD in a bag and she put the CD WITH THE BAG IN HER PURSE. Now what was the point of using a bag?

I’d joke with people about buying reusable bags if they needed a bag for their bags. It was funny for both the customer and I, until someone actually ASKED FOR A PLASTIC BAG FOR HER REUSABLE BAGS.

I’ve gotten to the point where I thank people at my till for not using a plastic bag just because it is such a relief when people don’t take them.

In Nova Scotia, that plastic bag blowing in the wind has the most likely chance of winding up in the ocean. Marine mammals are being found with bellies full of plastic, including plastic bags, and we still have people not caring about how much plastic they are actually using.

Don’t get me wrong, if you need a bag for your 5 bags of chips and two six-packs of coke, sure, I will not look at you and say you don’t need one. Just think about a reusable bags or foregoing a single bag for your chocolate bar you are going to finish before even leaving the store.

I am a ball player and so can you

Co-ed rec leagues piss me off.

Nine times out of ten, the team organizers get female players as a warm body.

I saw this so many times last year playing in a softball team in Halifax that I started calling people out on it. It was numerous games into the season and female players were still left to their own devices, swinging baseball bats like hockey sticks and looking like fools.

So many times I’ve heard the excuses; it’s their first game, blah blah blah. At your first game, you should at least be showing them how to swing a bat, when to run, when to hold up, basic rules. Step up, people.

Next reason, I can hit. I’ve been able to swing a bat and hit a ball since I was four years old.

Don’t move up on me. Sure, yes, I can’t hit as far as some guys, but there is a point where you are just downright insulting.

Playing ball tonight, even in an intermediate league with experienced women, left field moved right up to the edge of the grass when I came up.

So let’s see. I had solid hits all game. I look like I know what I’m doing. I switch hit and hit off field, you’ve seen me do it. And yet, you move up to a point in the field that is downright insulting. Yeah, way to call it, buddy.

Guys, come on. Women can and do play sports.

Wanna to make your team stronger, if your girls can’t play, show them how. Women coming up to bat, give them a little credit until they show you otherwise.

Royal Nova Scotia Tattoo – Halifax, NS

The Tattoo is a big part of a Nova Scotia summer. Even with the insane amount of festivals and events, don’t miss the Tattoo if you are ever in Halifax.

Along with amazing music and pageantry, the Tattoo displayed the military history of Canada but this year had groups representing United States, France, Germany, Norway, Oman, Sweden and Estonia.

This quote was mentioned numerous times during the performance. The Tattoo represents this notion that enemies can become friends.

The entire 2015 Tattoo cast. Photo by Becky Zimmer
The entire 2015 Tattoo cast. Photo by Becky Zimmer

Healing such wounds requires enemies to embark on the journey to become friends, which starts with our memories of the hurt we have suffered and ends with a shared understanding of the hurt we have caused each other. – Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby

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His Majesty the King’s Guard Band and Drill Team of Norway. Photo by Becky Zimmer
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RCMP National Ceremonial Troop. Photo by Becky Zimmer
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RCMP National Ceremonial Troop. Photo by Becky Zimmer
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Paris Police Gymnastics and Motorcycle Teams. Photo by Becky Zimmer
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Adult and children choirs. Photo by Becky Zimmer

McNabs Island – Halifax Harbour

Had an awesome day walking around McNabs Island. I’m going to start volunteering with the Friends of McNabs Island Society and they weren’t at all upset when I said I’d never been. They just said, okay, let’s get you over there.

My tour guide’s name was Dylan and he did an amazing job explaining all the little trails and 200 year old buildings. Most of the island is a mystery since there has been evidence of people living on the island up to 5000 years ago.

Being at the mouth of the Halifax Harbour, McNabs was a perfect place for forts, munitions batteries and lookout posts going back to the War of 1812. None of the military outposts ever saw action in any wars but, if you know your 1812 and WW history, Halifax was an important naval port with ships and resources for the British and Canadians army departing from Halifax. It was just an obvious port to protect. With such strong outposts, no one ever tried to attack Canada through Nova Scotia.

During World Wars 1 and 2, the batteries and forts were fortified and a lot of them rebuilt and strengthened. McNabs and Point Pleasant was the lookouts for submarines trying to enter the harbour.

Along with military establishments, there was also lots of people living and visiting the island for the last 200 years. Evidence of picnic sites and fair grounds can still be found on the island and newspaper clippings from the times notes many large societal events taking place on McNabs.

Along with Lawlor Island right beside it, there is also a dark history to the area. During the Cholera breakout in the late 19th century, McNabs island became a place of quarantine for those infected. The HMS England had over 400 people coming from England and infected with Cholera and were directed to McNabs. Two mass graves are on the island from the 200 people who died. Because of erosion, many think one of the grave sites has been washed into the ocean.

After four hours of hiking, I’ve still only seen about half the island.

Photo by Becky Zimmer
My boyfriend loves this one because I got the flower crab spider in the shot. Photo by Becky Zimmer
Entrance to Fort McNab. Photo by Becky Zimmer
Entrance to Fort McNab. Photo by Becky Zimmer
The McNab family graveyard. Photo by Becky Zimmer
The McNab family graveyard. Photo by Becky Zimmer
One of the buildings at Fort McNab. Photo by Becky Zimmer
One of the buildings at Fort McNab. Photo by Becky Zimmer
World War 2 gun at Fort McNabs. Still set up. Photo by Becky Zimmer
World War 2 gun at Fort McNabs. Still set up. Photo by Becky Zimmer
View from inside one of the lookouts at Fort McNab. Photo by Becky Zimmer
View from inside one of the lookouts at Fort McNab. Imagine being a soldier and constantly looking for enemy ships. Photo by Becky Zimmer
View from inside one of the lookouts at Fort McNab. Photo by Becky Zimmer
View from inside one of the lookouts at Fort McNab. Photo by Becky Zimmer
The open ocean. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
The open ocean. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
On the horizon is more McNabs Island. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
On the horizon is more McNabs Island. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
McNabs Pond. Photo by Becky Zimmer
McNabs Pond. Photo by Becky Zimmer
Hangman's Beach. Photo by Becky Zimmer
Hangmans Beach. Photo by Becky Zimmer
Just outside of Strawberry Battery. Photo by Becky Zimmer
Just outside of Strawberry Battery. Photo by Becky Zimmer
More open ocean. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
More open ocean. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
Stony beach at McNabs Island. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
Stony beach at McNabs Island. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
One of the few permanent  inhabitants of the island. Photo by Becky Zimmer
One of the few permanent inhabitants of the island. Photo by Becky Zimmer
Hugonin Point. Site for one of the Cholera mass graves but since it wasn't marked, no one knows if erosion has cause the bodies to fall into the ocean. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
Hugonin Point. Site for one of the Cholera mass graves but since it wasn’t marked, no one knows if erosion has cause the bodies to fall into the ocean. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
Maugers Lighthouse, now  automated and on the short list to be demolished. Hangmans Beach is only accessible at low tide and even then, you're going to get wet getting out to the lighthouse. Photo by Becky Zimmer.
Maugers Lighthouse, now automated and on the short list to be demolished. Hangmans Beach is only accessible at low tide and even then, you’re going to get wet getting out to the lighthouse. Photo by Becky Zimmer.

Being Canadian

20150630_104319Waving to strangers walking down the street
Flags on bridges and sewn into jerseys
Seeing the beauty of a field of wheat,
A mountain range
And a blue harbour
My phone accepting the fact that I spell things with an “ou”
Still being proud of Canada because pride goes deeper than who’s in charge
Wanting to educate non-Canadians on how awesome Canada is
Welcoming EVERYONE into our country
Making our country better